What You Never Heard

Question Mark

Question Mark (Photo credit: higgledy-piggledy)

To obtain knowledge is to have a key. Keys unlock doors, and thus the more keys you have, the more doors you can open. Behind those doors is opportunity to make one a more successful/fulfilled individual. The best way to obtain keys is going to the library. Unlocking doors should begin at a very young age and should never end. So here begs the question.

 

Were you ever told that  a book in a particular section was “to big” for you?

 

As a child, how did that make you feel? Were you offended, determined to prove them wrong, or did you accept it at face value? I visited the library yesterday, and a parent was leading their child through the books in the children’s library. Suddenly the child picked up a non-fiction book about the Egyptian culture. I smiled faintly, but it was short lived. The parent took the book, and told the child that it was “to big” for them. I was flabbergasted. The child’s disappointment was clear, but made no fuss.

I wanted to tell the parent; “You can read it if you feel that’s the case, but depriving a child of knowledge of culture at a young age devalues their appreciation for it.” Of course, as fitting human nature, I said nothing because it was appropriate to say nothing. I never heard those words as a child. When I went to a section in the childrens library wherever I was, any book was fair game. If I couldn’t read it, I tried my best anyway. To this day I think that determination helped me read, because my curiosity was so great. When I saw a book with a catchy title or a nice picture at the front, I *HAD* to have it.

It is much more prudent to say “that book is hard to read” rather then “it’s to big for you”. Why? Because it spreads the book’s *responsibility* of difficulty and lays a standard for fairness in saying just in general that it is hard to read. While the latter is a direct and clearly aimed gripe about the child’s ability, only barely concerning the book as “it’s”. There has been a steady drop in the reading and writing scores of children across the state, while math scores remain high and dry. Schools aren’t taking reading and writing as seriously as they used to, and I think that is an American dilemma. We love science, so of course the ability to read and write is redundant in regards to high mathematical prowess. Or… is it?

You’re thoughts ladies and gentlemen?

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